SUSTAINABLE BATHROOM

SUSTAINABLE-BATH

Monday is upon us once again and we welcome it hesitantly. First with a cup of freshly brewed coffee, followed by a stroll around the block. After stretching out our legs and embracing the new week ahead, another cup of coffee is in order. This may or may not be your morning routine, however one thing that we all have in common when we get ready to jump start our day is this: the bathroom!  We all find ourselves in it at some point. Before or, more likely after coffee, tea or any other cleansing beverage of choice.

For that reason, it is rather strange to think that even though restrooms are as important to us as our re-usable water bottles (for example), sometimes the idea of a “green” bath may seem dubious. Nonetheless, bathrooms make up a significant proportion of a building’s water and energy consumption. For this reason, restrooms are emerging as a core opportunity for designers, developers and builders to create a more eco-aware environment and gain LEED points at the same time.

But what, exactly, constitutes a sustainable bathroom? Simply put, it includes devices that use less water, ones that save energy, and spaces thoughtfully constructed with resource-efficient materials.

Houzz wrote an article back in January (read it here) about the newest eco-friendly surface materials in the market. We decided to take our pick and narrow our top 3 choices. Here it is…

CONCRETE: It is easy on the environment and is just as durable as stone. This material is a mixture of cement, fly ash, gravel or other aggregates that create a hard surface.

“BOTTLED STONE”: Created by San Jose company, Fire Clay Tile, this manufactured stone comprised of concrete and glass soda or beer bottles. The finished material can be made into color, polished or unpolished or with or without large glass fragments.

RECYCLED TIRES: A green intent to divert some redundant tires from landfills to bathrooms, Minarc – a Southern California company – created classy sinks out of the material.

Do you have any other eco-friendly surface materials of choice?